How to End a Cover Letter (Examples Included)

By Mike Simpson

Did you know that 86 percent of executives think cover letters are valuable parts of an application? It’s true. That’s why making sure yours packs a punch is so important, including your cover letter closing.

In many cases, candidates spend most of their time fretting about the main body paragraphs when writing their cover letters, giving little if any thought to how to end a cover letter.

The problem is, your last paragraph and closing sentence make up part of your first impression, playing a big role in whether you land an interview. Is ignoring something so critical a good idea? Of course not.

Luckily, you’re here, and we have your back. Come with us as we explore the ins and outs of how to end a cover letter with style and professionalism.

What Is a Cover Letter?

Alright, before we really dig into how to close a cover letter, let’s take a quick step back and discuss what a cover letter is and what it’s for.

Now, we’ve actually taken a deep dive into how to write a cover letter before, as well as providing some outstanding cover letter examples and helpful cover letter tips. But, as a quick summary, a cover letter is a short, written introduction that supplements your resume. It gives the hiring manager more insights into what you bring to the table, covering points that won’t fit in your resume and giving you some room to showcase your personality.

Technically, every part of your cover letter is important. You want to make sure you address your cover letter properly, nail your introductory paragraph, offer enticing tidbits in the body, and close strong.

In fact, one could argue that your opening and closing paragraphs are the most important. While your opener serves as the initial introduction, your cover letter closing cements your first impression. By nailing it, you can leave the hiring manager with a warm, fuzzy feeling about what you have to offer. That’s powerful stuff.

Alright, but what exactly is your cover letter closing? Well, the closing of your cover letter is typically your final paragraph, as well as your closing sentiment and signature. Each of those sections cements your first impression, so they are all relevant to the equation.

With your final paragraph, you’re wrapping up what you wanted to say, which is why it’s part of the closing. The sentiment before your signature, however, also plays a role. While it may only be a word or two, the words you choose do make an impact, so they are also part of the closing.

And, yes, your signature (and contact details) is also included in the closing. How you present that information does matter, so you want to get it right, too.

What about a postscript (P.S.)? If I have one of those, is it part of the closing? Well, technically, it could be. However, a cover letter really shouldn’t have a postscript. We’ll get into why in a second.

Common Mistakes When Ending a Cover Letter and How to Avoid Them

Alright, we know you’re chomping at the bit for an overview of how to close a cover letter and some examples. We promise they are coming. The thing is, we need to tap on something else important before we get there: common cover letter closing mistakes.

As with all parts of your application, certain mistakes in your cover letter can spell doom for your job search. Thankfully, most of them are completely avoidable. As long as you know to watch out for them and to take steps to address them, you’re set.

So, what are some common mistakes when ending a cover letter? Generally, the biggest mistake you can make when in any part of your cover letter has typos. In fact, 58 percent of hiring managers will remove you from contention if your cover letters contain errors. Ouch.

Luckily, avoiding typos is pretty easy. By simply proofreading your cover letter, making use of handy tools like spell and grammar checks, and asking a trusted family member or friend to take a look, you can probably catch any errors and get them fixed before you submit your cover letter.

Another doozy is making your cover letter too generic. Failing to tailor the content – including the cover letter closing – can cost you big, as 36 percent of hiring managers will toss your application if it isn’t personalized for the job you’re trying to land.

How do you avoid a generic cover letter? By using the Tailoring Method when you write. That way, your content will be incredibly relevant to that role. Problem solved!

Additionally, using the wrong tone can be an issue. While you want to come across as confident, it’s also important to be gracious, appreciative, and polite. If you’re too forceful, aggressive, or boastful, that could hurt your chances instead of helping.

Instead, focus on being passionate about what you do, excited about the opportunity, and thankful that the hiring manager took the time to read your cover letter. That way, your closing is powerful and positive, ensuring the final part of this first impression hits the mark.

Alright, the final mistake we’ll tap on is adding a P.S. to your cover letter. While it may seem like a way to stand out or draw attention to a specific sentence, there’s a good chance it’ll backfire. Postscripts tend to look unprofessional.

Plus, it makes it seem like you couldn’t figure out how to get that point to fit into your letter properly, which could put your communication skills into question. In some cases, the hiring manager might even think that you don’t know how document creation software works, causing you to believe that you couldn’t go back and edit the content to fit that point in.

Finally, there’s actually a chance the hiring manager won’t notice the P.S. at the bottom. If you wait until then to say something important, you’re risking it not getting read at all. That’s no good.

So, while a P.S. could stand out, there’s also a really good chance that the move will backfire. As a result, it’s better to fit that detail into the rest of your letter instead of saving it for a postscript.

How to End a Cover Letter

Here’s what you’ve all been waiting for. To make closing out your next cover letter a breeze, here’s a step-by-step guide on how to end a cover letter.

1. Summarize What You Bring to the Table

Generally, the last paragraph of your cover letter should mirror your introductory one. You want to offer a simple summary that showcases why you’re a stellar candidate, touching on the key skills you bring to the table that the hiring manager wants to find.

Now, the trick is, you want to restate what you’ve shared without rehash the exact phrases you used earlier in the cover letter. That way, this part of the letter feels fresh.

2. Appreciation for Their Time

After your quick summary, thank the hiring manager for taking the time to consider your application. It’s a small gesture, but it’s nonetheless critical.

Everyone likes to feel appreciated. By adding a thank-you moment into your closing, you’re recognizing that the hiring manager is doing you a favor by reading your cover letter, and that can have a big impact on the tone of your closing.

3. A (Confident and Excited) Look Toward the Future

Next, it’s time to add a bit of confidence and excitement about what the future may hold by letting the hiring manager know you’re looking forward to the next steps. It’s a polite way to reassert your interest in the job, ensuring you plant the right seeds without being too aggressive.

Additionally, when done properly, you can take this part to the next level. It’s another opportunity to mention how you are ready to put a relevant skill to work to help the company achieve a particular goal.

Now, the latter approach should only be used if it feels right with the rest of your cover letter. Additionally, you can’t pull this off unless you’ve done a bit of research (which is something you did before you started writing your cover letter, right?). It only works if you can tap on something specific. If you can’t do that, then opt for a more classic approach.

4. Choose the Right Closing Sentiment

The closing phrase you choose before adding your signature does matter. Some options are more appropriate than others. For example, while “Sincerely,” “Thank You,” or “Best Regards” are usually safe bets, using “Fondly,” “Love,” or “Warmly” isn’t.

In the end, a cover letter is a type of formal correspondence. That means you need to err on the side of caution and avoid a cover letter closing that feels too casual or personal. By sticking with the business correspondence classics, you’re probably in good shape.

MIKE'S TIP: While it may seem like closing with “Eagerly awaiting your response” or something similar would be appropriate for a cover letter closing, it isn’t. Sure, it may look enthusiastic to you. The thing is, the hiring manager might see it as pushy or even desperate. By using “eagerly,” you may come across a bit too strong, which isn’t ideal. As a result, it is usually best to go in another direction.

5. Sign Off (and Include Your Contact Details)

After your closing, you want to list your name, as well as your contact details. Not only does that keep that information conveniently located but, if your cover letter and resume get separated, it guarantees the hiring manager knows the cover letter is yours.

When it comes to contact details, list your email address and phone number at a minimum. If you’re like, you can also include your LinkedIn URL. Just make sure you actually put the URL and not just a link. That way, if the hiring manager prints out your cover letter, they can still reach your profile with ease.

3 Cover Letter Ending Examples

Sometimes, nothing is quite as helpful as an amazing example. With a cover letter closing example, you can see how these critical paragraphs are constructed. Then, you can use them as a framework when you write your own.

Generally, the core strategy for how to close a cover letter remains the same. However, the details change depending on the role and the overall approach. To help you see how to put the tips above into action, here are three cover letter ending examples – based on three different kinds of roles – that you can tweak to meet your needs.

1. Customer Service

With my customer-oriented mindset and previous experience working in a fast-paced retail environment providing exceptional support, I believe that my capabilities make me a great candidate for this position. I appreciate your consideration and look forward to learning more about the opportunity, as well as any next steps in your hiring process.

Sincerely,

[Your Name] [Email] [Phone Number] [LinkedIn URL] [Personal Website URL]

2. Technology

Ultimately, I am excited to apply my software development skills and education to a new challenge, and I feel that I can help ABC Company achieve its goals of advancing technology innovations in the industry. Thank you for considering my application. I look forward to not only discussing my capabilities with your further but also learning more about this exciting opportunity.

Thank you,

[Your Name] [Email] [Phone Number] [LinkedIn URL] [Personal Website URL]

3. Management

I, like XYZ Corp., feel like people are always a company’s greatest asset. Your company’s mission and values initially attracted me to this position, and I believe that my skills and experience align with not only your broader goals but also the organization’s culture. Thank you for reviewing my application, and I look forward to hearing back from you about this exceptional opportunity.

Best Regards,

[Your Name] [Email] [Phone Number] [LinkedIn URL] [Personal Website URL]

Putting It All Together

Ultimately, you should now have a pretty solid idea of how to end a cover letter with a bang. Take advantage of every tip above as a starting point. Then, really work to tailor your cover letter closing to the job, ensuring that it packs an amazing punch and helps you stand out from other applicants. After all, your closing is part of your first impression. Always make it count.

Good luck!

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About The Author

Mike Simpson

Co-Founder and CEO of TheInterviewGuys.com. Mike is a job interview and career expert and the head writer at TheInterviewGuys.com. His advice and insights have been shared and featured by publications such as Forbes, Entrepreneur, CNBC and more as well as educational institutions such as the University of Michigan, Penn State, Northeastern and others. Learn more about The Interview Guys on our About Us page.